asapscience:

A *REAL* image captured by Cassini of two of Saturn’s moons. Rhea, the planet’s third largest moon is sighted next to Epimetheus, a small, inner moon. Breathtaking! 
via ScienceAlert

asapscience:

A *REAL* image captured by Cassini of two of Saturn’s moons. Rhea, the planet’s third largest moon is sighted next to Epimetheus, a small, inner moon. Breathtaking! 

via ScienceAlert

posted on 20.08.14

bravecadet:

posted on 20.08.14

artchipel:

Christoph Bader (Germany) - wired uk 0513 0711

Processes that produce shapes are a central theme of Christoph Bader’s work: “To me this is a switch from a product oriented thinking to a process oriented way of working. This if often called generative or procedural design. In generative design you as a designer are no longer manly concerned about the outcome or the final product rather you are focused on the process which generates the final result. Designing processes is the business of a generative designer. These processes generate theoretically infinitely many outcomes and as such can be a valuable tool.”

© All images courtesy of the artist

[more Christoph Bader]

posted on 20.08.14

innocenttmaan:

Tanaka Tatsuya, an artist from Japan, created dioramas everyday for four years and compiled the work into an online calendar. These creations are so fun and so amazing.

posted on 20.08.14

rrsherborne:

Watch video HERE.

Click ‘HD’.

posted on 19.08.14

mayahan:

Aluminum Cans Delightfully Transformed into Pop Culture Icons
Makaon

posted on 19.08.14

sanosagara:

The art of Japanese ✪ Manhole Covers

posted on 19.08.14

archiemcphee:

These intricate and extraordinarily beautiful embroidered silk balls are a form of Japanese folk art called Temari, which means “hand ball” in Japanese. These particular temari are even more impressive because they were handmade by a 92-year-old grandmother in Japan.

"Although she only learned this elaborate skill in her sixties, she has since created nearly 500 unique designs that have been photographed by her granddaughter NanaAkua. Impressive does not even begin to describe this feat of dexterity, imagination and keen eyesight. The difficult process of becoming a recognized temari craftsman in Japan is tedious and requires specific training and testing. This grandmother must certainly be one motivated and talented woman. And if that was not enough to garner your complete admiration, she now volunteers every week teaching others how to make their own temari.”

Temari have been made in Japan since the 7th century and are still highly valued and cherished as gifts symbolizing deep friendship and loyalty. They are traditionally given to children by their parents on New Year’s Day. Mothers place a small piece of paper with a secret goodwill wish for her child inside the tightly-wrapped ball. Alternately, some temari are made as noisemakers by placing rice grains or bells in the center.

Visit My Modern Metropolis to view more of NanaAkua’s photos of her grandmother’s beautiful handiwork and learn more about this stunning Japanese holiday tradition.

posted on 19.08.14

ratak-monodosico:

X-Ray Gifs Cameron Drake

(Source: moshita)

posted on 12.08.14

whatthefauna:

When osprey fish, they soar above the water until they spot their prey. Then they dive talons-first into the water, often submerging themselves completely.

After making a catch, osprey will adjust their grasp on the fish so that it faces forward. This aligns the fish with their direction of movement to make flying away more efficient.

Images: Michael Wulf, Txema Garcia 

posted on 12.08.14

posted on 12.08.14

posted on 12.08.14

archiemcphee:

Melbourne-based artist Daniel Agdag uses little more than cardboard, a scalpel and his own imagination to create incredible sculptures of fantastic flying and industrial machines. Each fascinating piece is so complex and detailed that it seems certain they must’ve required lots of advance planning and drawing, but Agdag prefers to work intuitively. He describes his process as “sketching with cardboard.”

Agdag’s first solo exhibition, entitled The Principles of Aerodynamics, recently opened at the MARS gallery in Windsor, New South Wales and will be on display through August 31, 2014.

Visit Daniel Agdag’s website to check out more of his captivating cardboard contraption.

[via Colossal]

posted on 12.08.14

armedskeeter:

Source

posted on 27.07.14

littlelimpstiff14u2:

Scanning electron microscope images of of trichomes
Title: Galileo Galilei

posted on 27.07.14

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